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vacances demillac RCM guitar

Learn to Play Vacances (Demillac) from RCM Level One on Classical Guitar

Vacances (“Vacation”) by Yvon Demillac is a beautiful French piece for classical guitar.

The RCM Bridges Series has many tunes, old to modern, that are fun to play and musically compelling.  The early levels especially are must-haves for any classical guitarist.

Watch the videos below for tips on how to practice and learn Vacances, so you play it beautifully.

Click here to purchase the RCM Repertoire and Etudes Level One Book. 
(You’ll find many great tunes in this series, and the book is worth the investment.

 

Click Here for other tutorials from the RCM Bridges Series.

About the RCM Bridges Series:

(From Amazon) Bridges: A Comprehensive Guitar Series serves as the official resource for guitar assessments of the Royal Conservatory Music Development Program. Innovative in its structure, Bridges supports students from the beginner to advanced levels with carefully sequenced repertoire, etudes, and technique. Each of the Repertoire and Etudes books in the series spans all major style periods and a variety of genres, presenting an organized compilation of pieces appropriate for that level of technical development. Nine progressive levels of Repertoire and Etudes scaffold student learning at every stage of musical development. Each book contains a balanced and representative selection of works from the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and contemporary style periods. From the classics of Aguado to the modern compositions of Zenamon, Bridges connects students to both essential literature and enticing masterpieces never before found together. The Etudes have been carefully selected to support the repertoire and isolate specific technical and musical challenges, making Bridges an ideal collection and a comprehensive teaching resource.

Click here to purchase the RCM Repertoire and Etudes Level One Book. 
(You’ll find many great tunes in this series, and the book is worth the investment.

2 Responses to Learn to Play Vacances (Demillac) from RCM Level One on Classical Guitar

  1. Paul Prachun October 28, 2018 at 1:20 pm #

    Good Day Allen:

    Hope this note finds you and yours well.
    A couple of queries.

    1. What is the music software program you are using as you are performing your teaching videos? I’m using my large iPad for more and more practicing and I think your software program could be a helpful adjunct to my daily guitar strangulations! – my wife’s interpretation of my practice sessions.

    2. I notice that you have a number of RCM pieces listed in your teaching repertoire, all are of either the preparatory or Level I volumes. I’ve been using these myself for a couple of years and am currently entering Level 4. I also used this series about 25 years ago, when I was living in Canada, to achieve my Grade V piano levels, and have found them an excellent source of teaching material. Having said that, it is considerably more difficult to work at these without a real slave-driver type teacher on board as well.

    Do you have any intention of adding more RCM lessons from the more advanced volumes above the Level I? I would really be in favor of this and would really respect you.

    — Paul

    PS: I respect you anyway?

    • Allen October 29, 2018 at 10:53 am #

      Hi Paul,
      Thanks for the questions.
      My video setup is a little complex. I use Sibelius to prepare scores. Then I open them in Photoshop in a video-sized window (1280×720). Then I write on them in photoshop using a Bamboo Pad. Meanwhile I use Screenflow to record the screen. We then crop the video to the image window, removing the photoshop editor around it. You could probably find something simpler for practice purposes. I have seen some app that lets you write on sheet music, but I can’t remember what it’s called.

      The issues in the larger pieces are the same as they are for the “easier” ones. So I prefer to do the “easier” ones. In larger pieces, the issues are more numerous and closer together. So it’s very easy to slip into the “just get the notes” mode. Instead, I recommend doing some of the lower-level course pieces, and generalizing the lessons learned.
      That said, I am doing more intermediate pieces these days, but not chosen from those books. But some of them may well be in there. If there are any in particular you think would be good candidates, I would love to hear them.

      Thanks again,
      Allen

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